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Mayor Calls for 'Balance' in Timber Creek Park

Mayor David Mayer stops short of calling for a halt to disc golf plans, but publicly asserts the project must be "done in the right way."

Mayor David Mayer addressed a group of residents' concerns over the development of a disc golf course in Timber Creek Park during Monday night's Township Council meeting.

"It has to be done in the right way," Mayer said of the project.

Timber Creek Park is a 128-acre property located off Chews Landing Road in Gloucester Township. The land is owned and maintained by Camden County.

Mayer recently walked the proposed disc golf course and wasn't thrilled with what he saw there.

"My concern was that it was really encroaching on a lot of the sensitive areas in that park," he said Monday night.

The mayor indicated he brought up his concerns with Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash, liaison to both the Camden County Department of Parks and Camden County Division of Environmental Affairs, during a discussion earlier Monday.

"I think that we have to find a balance—a balance providing recreation here in Gloucester Township with protecting our environment," Mayer said.

Mayer remains optimistic something will be worked out that will both protect Timber Creek Park's natural environment and provide avid disc golfers with a second Camden County course—the first opened in Voorhees earlier this year.

He did note, though, that the decision ultimately will fall on county officials, since Camden County owns the property.

"It's not a decision that I or the township get to make," the mayor said.

Mayer told Timber Creek Park activist Chris Schillizzi, who attended Monday's meeting, that he will put the concerns he expressed to Nash into writing.

Schillizzi and a few others launched the "Save Timber Creek Park" Facebook page on Sept. 28 after Schillizzi and his wife, Joanne, discovered about 50 trees had been cut down to make way for the disc golf course.

Mayer and Council President Glen Bianchini, as councilmen in 2003, fought a developer's proposal to build some 800 homes on the land now known as Timber Creek Park, the officials said.

"It is a gem, and I'm glad it's preserved," Bianchini said.

Anonymous 4 CamCo October 26, 2012 at 08:06 PM
Hey Sean, it's not our fault Dave is all butt-hurt over this. Thin skinned with an attitude. Sounds like the current occupier of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. He even has the press protecting him. Bwahahahaha!!!!
JakeT October 31, 2012 at 04:47 PM
Both sides need to relax a little here. Protecting the environment is indeed a worth cause, but having done a little research these frisbee golfers seem to do more good than harm in that regard. I am not a player, but I have seen trashed parks and underutilized public land revitalized by the inclusion of a frisbee golf course. Before retiring to NJ, I used to live in Dover, NH where there is a frisbee golf course in a public park. I walked my dog there before and after the course was installed, and I have nothing but good things to say about the golfers there. The land in question, Bellamy Park, was overgrown and unhealthy (not to mention full of beer cans) before the golfers came in. Like you all, I was initially concerned when I heard a course would be installed, thinking the land would be unavailable for me and my old beast. In fact, not only did the golfers clean up the weeds and trash, they would stop playing every time I came hobbling through (an exercise in patience as I am not young or fleet footed). It seems like there is a lot of confusion amongst opponents of this venture as to what is actually entailed in the creation of a course. Most of them appear to have very little impact on the natural land (unlike a paintball course as a previous commenter joked about) and use the natural landscape as opposed to altering it like a regular golf course. They want to keep as many trees as possible to make the course more challenging, not cut them all down to make an open lane.
JakeT October 31, 2012 at 04:47 PM
Some of the biggest conservationists I knew in NH played frisbee golf, and while not every golfer will be a positive factor for the course (just like not all hikers and dog walkers), the vast majority of them are a major boon to the land.
Chris November 01, 2012 at 12:44 AM
your not so anonymous when you create this page on Facebook CHRIS SCHILLIZZI and are the only person to "Like" it. You are the person with an agenda who has a pompous attitude to anyone who disagrees with you.
Dennis Byrne November 01, 2012 at 04:35 AM
Anonymous 4 CamCo is a hoot! He/she should write for Jay Leno or Letterman. Talk about drawing conclusions from thin air, and making ominous sounding implications based on NO FACTS at all. There is no money to be made from disc golf. Most players and especially promoters are spending money & time from their own pocket to provide a public service. Removal of trees on courses is almost always dead or invasive species. It doesn't stop dog walkers or anyone else from enjoying the property. In fact, it has been used successfully, many times, to drive unwanted illegal activites out of parks and return them to positive public use. Commcast can't possibly be making $$ from the disc golf tv show as the rating points are likely close to zero (only because most people are unfamiliar with the sport). Disc golf is an excellent "lifesport" that virtually anyone can play (even blind, visually impaired, and other special needs individuals), school age to golden age, with a simple, inexpensive piece of plastic. Just one will do. It takes a lot less time to play than ball-golf, and can be enjoyed by the entire family together (with their dog). I guess that if my logic and arguments where as weak as "Anonymous", I wouldn't show my name or face either!

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